Ask the CounterPro

Counterman.com has a crack team of past Counter Professionals of the Year, editors and and technicians at the ready to answer your technical and general business queries.

Our experts will tackle your questions and post the answers online.

Want to participate? If you have what it takes to be an Ask A CounterPro board member, please email editor Mark Phillips,

[email protected] and tell him.

Ask the Counterpro isn’t for questions that need immediate answers. (i.e. If someone’s at the counter or on the telephone with you, we won’t be able to respond that quickly.)

 

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Recent Questions

 

Latest (10)

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This is a great question!  There are many ways to deal with the phone call however, each scenario is different.

We are trained to answer the phone by the third ring and most times we do. But, this is the quandary begins I am sure.

I think it is all about the customer whom is front of you at the time and whom is on the phone.

You have to read the customer in front of you and see if that person is being impatient. It is imperative that you take care of that customer as they are captive in your store and ready to spend money so you can ill afford for them to walk away.

However, over the years, many companies have put a grand emphasis on the phone-in customer and your company has a policy I am sure. But, in reality that policy is suggestive, right?

So, finally to the answer as I see it. Politely ask the in-store customer to excuse you while you answer the phone. The customer on the phone should be informed you are with another customer and you will be back with them shortly. If you are going to be delayed and there is no one else to assist them you might ask for a number to call them back.

Most customers that frequent our stores know what we deal with and are patient with that scenario.  However, if they decide to hold be sure and go back about every 45 seconds or so and let them know you have not forgotten about them.

We also play favorites as well, a customer that spends $2,500 a month with us will get top billing and get helped before the customer at the counter.

Hope I helped with the quandary, thanks for the question.

Gerald Wheelus

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I have to export your AC Delco Car Wash Shampoo to Japan. Do you have an export classification (tariff) number available. The msds doesn’t list anything under #14 regarding IATA regulations, do you know if its regulated for shipping by air? Thank yo

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Different people will tell you one brand is better than another. All oil is the same to a certain point. After that, manufacturer’s try to make them better. They put their own blend of additives in to withstand heat better, clean, etc. So, pick the one you like.

As far as viscosity, stick with manufacturers recommended viscosity. The tolerances in engine bearings are a lot smaller than they used to be and a thicker oil could cause damage. Plus, it will void your warranty If it’s a new vehicle.

Matthew Vaughn

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There are a lot of variables at play here. What is the quality of the pads and rotors that you used. Did you even change the pads? What are your stopping habits? Is the truck empty or loaded? All this comes into play. Sometimes all at once. But probably the biggest thing is breaking habits. A ton of folks like to wait till the last possible second to apply their brakes and try to stop in ten feet. What they should be doing is gradually slowing by gently applying the brake. Give yourself a lot of room to stop. Your brakes and your wallet will thank you.

Matthew Vaughn

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Questions (42)

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Those auto-locking hubs have a very weak plastic “cam” inside them, and when that wears or breaks, the clicking and ratcheting sound you describe is one of the common symptoms of the slipping hub. For further diagnostic info, a little about how they work, and also recommendations for upgrading these to a manual locking hub, try: http://therangerstation.com/tech_library/HubDiagnosis.html Tom Dayton JS Auto Supply

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Each of the gauges on these instrument clusters has a “stepper motor” behind it that moves the needle, and these motors are a common failure point to these trucks. When they go bad, they either fail to work at all, or stick in one position. A major aftermarket manufacturer (Dorman) offers rebuilt instrument clusters (with upgraded stepper motors) on an exchange basis. All you need is the VIN and mileage, then they program one and send it to your supplier, which you then exchange for your rebuildable core. They are reasonably priced, require limited down-time, and are fairly easy to install.

Tom Dayton
JS Auto Supply

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Are you sure the ECT (engine coolant temp) sensor is reading correctly? Was
the thermostat re-installed? Low temperature will cause extremely rich
mixture. The ECT overrides oxygen sensor, mass air flow sensor and all other
inputs. Plug in a scan tool and see what the warmed-up temp is and if the
ECM is in closed loop before you do anything else.

Jim O’Neill
Chino Autotech Inc.

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This is a great question! There are many ways to deal with the phone call however, each scenario is different.

We are trained to answer the phone by the third ring and most times we do. But, this is the quandary begins I am sure.

I think it is all about the customer whom is front of you at the time and whom is on the phone.

You have to read the customer in front of you and see if that person is being impatient. It is imperative that you take care of that customer as they are captive in your store and ready to spend money so you can ill afford for them to walk away.

However, over the years, many companies have put a grand emphasis on the phone-in customer and your company has a policy I am sure. But, in reality that policy is suggestive, right?

So, finally to the answer as I see it. Politely ask the in-store customer to excuse you while you answer the phone. The customer on the phone should be informed you are with another customer and you will be back with them shortly. If you are going to be delayed and there is no one else to assist them you might ask for a number to call them back.

Most customers that frequent our stores know what we deal with and are patient with that scenario. However, if they decide to hold be sure and go back about every 45 seconds or so and let them know you have not forgotten about them.

We also play favorites as well, a customer that spends $2,500 a month with us will get top billing and get helped before the customer at the counter.

Hope I helped with the quandary, thanks for the question.

Gerald Wheelus

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people found this helpful.

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This is an age old question and what the Ask the Counterpro program was started for to help counterpeople become better at what they do.

In one of these cases where customer are wrong, well you just have to eat the crow. However, most of our systems are capable of including the VIN code on them. Also, it is not out of reason to ask the customer what the made on date in the door jamb says.

Customers are not always right but they are always the customer.

However, this customer may be scamming you in some way so watch this one closely.

Gerald Wheelus

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