Ask the CounterPro

Counterman.com has a crack team of past Counter Professionals of the Year, editors and and technicians at the ready to answer your technical and general business queries.

Our experts will tackle your questions and post the answers online.

Want to participate? If you have what it takes to be an Ask A CounterPro board member, please email editor Mark Phillips,

[email protected] and tell him.

Ask the Counterpro isn’t for questions that need immediate answers. (i.e. If someone’s at the counter or on the telephone with you, we won’t be able to respond that quickly.)

 

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Latest (10)

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This is a great question!  There are many ways to deal with the phone call however, each scenario is different.

We are trained to answer the phone by the third ring and most times we do. But, this is the quandary begins I am sure.

I think it is all about the customer whom is front of you at the time and whom is on the phone.

You have to read the customer in front of you and see if that person is being impatient. It is imperative that you take care of that customer as they are captive in your store and ready to spend money so you can ill afford for them to walk away.

However, over the years, many companies have put a grand emphasis on the phone-in customer and your company has a policy I am sure. But, in reality that policy is suggestive, right?

So, finally to the answer as I see it. Politely ask the in-store customer to excuse you while you answer the phone. The customer on the phone should be informed you are with another customer and you will be back with them shortly. If you are going to be delayed and there is no one else to assist them you might ask for a number to call them back.

Most customers that frequent our stores know what we deal with and are patient with that scenario.  However, if they decide to hold be sure and go back about every 45 seconds or so and let them know you have not forgotten about them.

We also play favorites as well, a customer that spends $2,500 a month with us will get top billing and get helped before the customer at the counter.

Hope I helped with the quandary, thanks for the question.

Gerald Wheelus

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I have to export your AC Delco Car Wash Shampoo to Japan. Do you have an export classification (tariff) number available. The msds doesn’t list anything under #14 regarding IATA regulations, do you know if its regulated for shipping by air? Thank yo

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Different people will tell you one brand is better than another. All oil is the same to a certain point. After that, manufacturer’s try to make them better. They put their own blend of additives in to withstand heat better, clean, etc. So, pick the one you like.

As far as viscosity, stick with manufacturers recommended viscosity. The tolerances in engine bearings are a lot smaller than they used to be and a thicker oil could cause damage. Plus, it will void your warranty If it’s a new vehicle.

Matthew Vaughn

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There are a lot of variables at play here. What is the quality of the pads and rotors that you used. Did you even change the pads? What are your stopping habits? Is the truck empty or loaded? All this comes into play. Sometimes all at once. But probably the biggest thing is breaking habits. A ton of folks like to wait till the last possible second to apply their brakes and try to stop in ten feet. What they should be doing is gradually slowing by gently applying the brake. Give yourself a lot of room to stop. Your brakes and your wallet will thank you.

Matthew Vaughn

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Some electric fans will continue to run after the engine is shut off to provide a little extra cooling. Most generally shut off after about 30 seconds though. If his is continuing to run and not shutting off, then that is an obvious problem and needs to be corrected, and it will kill the battery.

Matthew Vaughn

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You have a vent mode actuator with a bad diaphragm. Most people don’t fix
them if it involves removing the complete dash. If the one acting up can be
reached from underdash or with the glove box removed, the actuator is
probably available from AC Delco, an HVAC supplier or the dealer can order
one for you.

Jim O’Neill
Chino Autotech Inc.

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Your local parts store should be able to provide a belt routing diagram, if you provide year, make, model, and engine. They may be able to print this information for you to take home, or draw it out for you. Some vehicles have this diagram printed on a decal on the radiator support, you may check there first. If all else fails, you could try this link: http://www.gates.com/part_locator/ Enter your vehicle information, and it will show a listing for “serpentine belt”, with a camera icon. Click the camera icon, and a window should open with the diagram you are looking for.

Tom Dayton
JS Auto Supply

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Many aftermarket vendors DO offer parts and supplies for non-automotive applications, and traditionally, parts stores have had cataloging and the personnel to find these parts. Considering that the OE parts at a JD dealership counter are often considerably more expensive than the aftermarket parts found in our stores, it can be a great savings to the customer. It is the same reason people choose us over the OE automobile dealer. It only benefits us (both at the store level, and industry-wide) to be knowledgeable about these nontraditional parts needs, and to be prepared to fill those needs. If a customer can purchase candy, soft drinks, and magazines at a parts store, then why should we turn away a sale for tractor parts?

Tom Dayton
JS Auto Supply

Are you referring specifically to off road equipment and such? If so, they may be off road and used in industries, but they are still automotive at heart. They have an engine, transmission, etc., and they break down also, just like a car. They need parts and parts stores handle that need.

Matthew Vaughn

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The first step regardless of differential type should be to check the fluid level and condition. If this is a limited slip differential, the whine and popping may be coming from the clutch pack. Check, drain, and refill the differential with the appropriate amount of fluid and limited slip additive (if required), and inspect the internal components for damage or wear.

Tom Dayton
JS Auto Supply

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