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The Importance of Talking to Your Customers About Potholes

We can all agree that potholes are bad. We can also agree that potholes are boring. They’re not a hot discussion topic for anyone outside the paving industry. But here’s the thing: If you are a parts professional, you need to talk about potholes with both your DIFM and DIY customers.

Sponsored by GMB North America, Inc.

We can all agree that potholes are bad. We can also agree that potholes are boring. They’re not a hot discussion topic for anyone outside the paving industry.

But here’s the thing: If you are a parts professional, you need to talk about potholes with both your DIFM and DIY customers.

Pothole Damage Is Incredibly Common

AAA has studied vehicle pothole damage, and the results are incredible:

  • Potholes cause an estimated $3 billion per year in vehicle damage
  • The average pothole damage repair bill is over $300
  • The average car has pothole damage that requires repair about once a year

And these figures do not include consumers who don’t know their vehicle has pothole damage – it’s self-reported data. The true figures are undoubtedly higher.

Talking About Potholes With Every Customer

Potholes can damage tires, wheels, wheel bearings and hubs, wheel alignment and balance, and more. This damage isn’t always obvious, and a lot of drivers aren’t aware of pothole damage risks. To make sure your customers understand pothole damage risks, try the following:

  • Ask DIY customers if they hit any potholes recently.
  • Ask the DIY customer if they’ve noticed potholes in a popular nearby road.
  • Before they leave, warn the customer about potholes near the store.

When you engage the customer on one of these points, be sure to follow-up with information about the damage that potholes can do. Your customers need to know to avoid potholes, and that hitting a pothole should prompt them to get their vehicle checked.

Potholes And Regular Repairs

Last but not least, it’s a good idea to relate regular repairs back to pothole damage. If, for example, the customer’s vehicle needs a new wheel hub and bearing, you can explain that every pothole impact causes wear and tear. If the customer’s vehicle is a few years old, it’s undoubtedly hit a few potholes.

What’s more, if your store is regularly talking about pothole damage, your loyal customers will better understand the need to invest in quality replacement parts. Saving a few dollars on a replacement part doesn’t make much sense if the quality is so bad that one good pothole can break it.

After all, investing in quality replacement parts is a good way to limit pothole damage.

This article was sponsored by GMB North America, Inc. For more information, please visit our website at www.gmb.net

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