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WATCH: Getting More from Gasket Sales

When a customer comes in for a gasket, think about the related fluids, filters and parts they might need to complete the repair.

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This video is sponsored by MAHLE.

Customers typically buy a gasket if their engine has an oil, coolant, vacuum or exhaust leak. They also might need certain gaskets if they’re rebuilding an engine, or replacing other engine components such as valve springs, rocker arms, pushrods, lifters, a camshaft, timing chain, water pump or cylinder head, to name a few.

But if a customer comes in looking for a gasket, there are other sales opportunities to explore. That’s because most repairs that involve replacing major gaskets also involve changing or replacing related fluids, filters and parts. That includes fasteners such as torque-to-yield head bolts, which should not be reused.

For example, a head-gasket repair also will require antifreeze, and probably new hoses and clamps. If the old gasket was leaking coolant into the crankcase, you also might want to recommend an oil-and-filter change. The same goes for an intake-manifold-gasket repair.

The best way to sell gaskets is to discuss the repair with your customer to find out what they’re replacing, and what gaskets and seals they need. Along the way, think about the related fluids, filters and parts they might need to complete the repair.

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