WATCH Ask The Expert: What's That Car Smell? Here's How To Get Rid Of It

WATCH Ask The Expert: What’s That Car Smell? Here’s How To Get Rid Of It

While some odors can be temporarily covered up after detailing, once a car sits on a lot or driveway and bakes in the sun, a smell is likely to return. That's because the source of the odor hasn't been identified and removed.

Hey, what’s that smell? If you have to ask, it probably ain’t good! We’ll tackle car odors on this installment of Counterman’s Ask the Expert!

Hi guys, it’s Mark Phillips. Trent asks, “Can a bad smell really decrease the value of a car?” Well Trent, yes! Let’s think about this, I think you already know the answer. After all, it’s all about first impressions. While some smells can be temporarily covered up after detailing, once a car sits on a lot or driveway and bakes in the sun, a smell is likely to return. That’s because the source of the odor hasn’t been identified and removed. To tackle really bad smells, you need a product that will penetrate deep to control the bacteria that causes the odors, guaranteeing a great first impression on every test drive.

Do you run a business where you keep cars overnight? Are you looking to improve the smell of your own car? Products like vapor treatments really get into bad smells and break them up. What kind of businesses could benefit from products like this? Collision repair shops; paint, brake, auto body shops; rental operations, used car lots, you name it.

Why use a vapor treatment over another product? Unlike a spray, clip, or gel air freshener that only treats topically, a vapor permeates deep into carpets, seat cushions, and headliners to eliminate odors at their source. Thanks again to Trent for his question and stay tuned for the next installment of Counterman’s Ask the Expert. I’m Mark Phillips.

You May Also Like

Advance Launches ‘Diehards Choose DieHard’ Campaign

The campaign features former Marine sergeant and world-renowned climber Kirstie Ennis.

Advance Auto Parts has unveiled a 60-second documentary-style video and campaign featuring former Marine sergeant and world-renowned climber Kirstie Ennis.

Titled “The Climber,” the video chronicles Ennis’s journey from serving in the U.S. Marine Corps and the loss of her leg above the knee after her helicopter went down in Afghanistan. It also captures her recovery and focus on tackling the Seven Summits, the highest mountain in each of the seven continents.

MEMA Establishes Center for Sustainability

The mission of the new Sustainability Center is to serve MEMA members wherever they are in their sustainability journey.

MEMA Names Jackson Executive Director of Strategy and Research

He most recently was executive director of strategy and research for MEMA’s light-duty original equipment division. 

MEMA Taps Gardner to Lead Marketing and Communications

Prior to MEMA’s reorganization, marketing and communication responsibilities were siloed across MEMA’s four divisions.

MEMA Reveals New Business Structure, Branding Strategy

MEMA will operate with two groups: MEMA Aftermarket Suppliers and MEMA Original Equipment Suppliers.

Other Posts

What Can Go Wrong with Engine-Management Electronics?

Powertrain control modules typically fail for one of two reasons.

Basic Types of Wiper Blades

Wiper-blade manufacturers are continually making improvements to the design and performance of replacement wiper blades.

From Building Race Engines to Building Sales Teams

Dave Caracci is a guy who can wield a wrench as deftly as he can a sales pitch.

Ultimate Frame Coater Kit Provides Inside-Out Rust Protection

The easy-to-use DIY kit can prepare and coat up to 50 square feet of metal.