Connect with us

News

BlackBerry Collaborates With Amazon Web Services For Connected-Vehicle Software Platform

BlackBerry Limited announced it has teamed up with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to demonstrate a connected-vehicle software platform for in-vehicle applications.

Advertisement
Click Here to Read More
Advertisement

The platform combines the safety and security of BlackBerry’s QNX real-time operating system with AWS’ Internet of Things (IoT) Services in the cloud and in the car, according to BlackBerry.

The platform enables automakers to securely access data from vehicle sensors, and create software applications and machine-learning models for connected, electric and autonomous vehicles.

“With the AWS-powered BlackBerry platform, automotive OEMs can expedite their vision of continuously and quickly bringing innovative connected-vehicle services to market, ranging from cockpit personalization, vehicle acoustic conditioning, vehicle health monitoring and advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) features,” BlackBerry said in a news release. “Car companies also can leverage the platform for their new software-centric electric car and autonomous platforms, enabling essential functions such as continuous EV battery-life monitoring and prediction, and managing vehicle sub-systems to holistically control warranty costs, providing important security updates and seamless updates of vehicle-software features to delight their customers, and drive monetization of vehicle data while exercising control over data access.”

The AWS-powered BlackBerry platform combines the two companies’ edge and cloud technologies into a comprehensive edge-to-cloud offering for the global automotive industry. QNX software allows automotive OEMs to develop and run a common software platform across in-vehicle systems such as gateways, TCUs, engine controllers, digital cockpits and emerging domain controllers, while AWS capabilities enable automotive software developers to securely and easily access data from vehicle sensors, build software applications and machine-learning (ML) models using vehicle data, and deploy them inside the vehicle to enable in-vehicle inference and actions.

Advertisement

The platform will integrate the BlackBerry QNX operating system and over-the-air software update services with AWS IoT cloud services for secure connectivity and telematics, Amazon SageMaker for developing ML models and AWS IoT edge services for in-vehicle ML inference.

“By working with AWS, we can provide OEMs with a unique foundational software platform that will allow them to build the next generation connected and autonomous cars of the future,” said John Wall, senior vice president and co-head of BlackBerry Technology Solutions. “By combining our technologies and strengths into one dedicated cloud-based offering, we can ensure automakers have the tools they need to deliver the driving experience consumers want, without sacrificing on the security and reliability they need.”

BlackBerry’s full suite of automotive offerings will be demonstrated at the Consumer Electronics Show, taking place Jan. 7-10 in Las Vegas.

“Our automotive customers are developing exciting new products and services that rely on the power of the cloud, IoT and AI/ML,” said Bill Vass, vice president, technology, Amazon Web Services. “We are thrilled to be working with BlackBerry QNX to provide secure connectivity and advanced edge computing capabilities for the next generation of electric and autonomous vehicles.”

Advertisement
Click to comment

General Motors Recognizes SKF As a Supplier Of The Year

Automakers Launch New Non-Saleable Parts/Airbag Lookup Tool

Icahn Automotive Awards Scholarships To 15 Aspiring Techs

DRIVE Names Fuerst Automotive June Shop Of The Month

Advertisement

POPULAR POSTS

Sponsored Content

Things To Consider When Choosing The Right Transmission Treatment For Your Customers

Sponsored Content

What’s That Noise? Explaining Water Pump Noises To Your Customers

Sponsored Content

Why Spark Plug Metallurgy Matters

Sponsored Content

Do Water-Pump Lubricants Really Work?

Connect