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Bosch X-Four Sensor Designed To Fit Tighter Space Under The Hood

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The latest in a long line of oxygen sensors offered by Bosch, the X-Four is smaller, more compact and offers greater flexibility to OEMs in selecting the mounting position, according to the company.

 

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LAS VEGAS, Nev. – Bosch has introduced the new generation X-Four Oxygen Sensor for the aftermarket. The latest in a long line of oxygen sensors offered by Bosch, the X-Four is smaller, more compact and offers greater flexibility to OEMs in selecting the mounting position, according to the company.

“The most noticeable visual feature is the X-Four sensor’s size,” said Sean Lappin, senior product manager, Gasoline Systems, Robert Bosch LLC. “At approximately two inches, from the top of the hex to the base of the grommet, the X-Four is about half as long as the standard Bosch planar-type sensor which makes it easier to fit in the gradually decreasing space under the hood of modern vehicles,” he said.

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Furthermore, another unique feature of the X-Four, said Lappin, “is the internal planar element – which is also about half an inch shorter – and reaches full operating temperature in less than seven seconds. The original unheated thimble type sensor took over a minute to reach full operating temperature. This means that with X-Four, you can expect improved emissions whether you are starting your engine in extreme cold or hot weather.”

A properly functioning oxygen sensor detects the amount of oxygen in a vehicle’s exhaust and sends a signal to the engine computer (ECM), which in turn, tells the fuel injectors to deliver the exact amount of fuel into the combustion chamber. This results in optimal air/fuel mixture leading to fuel efficiency and low emissions. Conversely, a worn out sensor can cause reduced gas mileage, poor engine performance and can even cause a vehicle to fail the emissions test.

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Too much oxygen in the exhaust indicates a ‘lean’ mixture, which can lead to performance problems, including misfire. On the other hand, too little oxygen indicates a ‘rich’ mixture that wastes fuel and causes excessive emissions. Either condition can shorten the life of the catalytic converter. Almost all gasoline-powered vehicles since 1986 have at least one oxygen sensor, and vehicles 1996 and newer have two sensors.

“On the OE-side of our business, Bosch engineers have been collaborating with vehicle manufacturers around the world to tailor the oxygen sensor to the needs of each platform. The Bosch new generation X-Four Oxygen Sensor is the latest addition and can already be found on domestic, Asian and European vehicles,” Lappin said.

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For more information on the Bosch portfolio of oxygen sensors, visithttp://www.boschautoparts.com/OxygenSensors/Pages/OxygenSensors.aspx.

 

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