Check the Part: Return Guide for Fluid Reservoirs

Check the Part: Return Guide for Fluid Reservoirs

Dorman recommends these four steps to determine if it’s a valid warranty claim.

It’s been estimated that fraudulent warranty claims cost auto parts stores $600 million every year.

Those costs stem from a number of expenses that are set in motion by a return, including manually processing credits; reverse logistics and transportation; repackaging products; and additional quality-control testing to rule out major defects in materials.

The “Check the Part” campaign estimates that more than 50% of warranty returns are either brand-new or not the manufacturer’s product – which suggests that many parts professionals aren’t even looking at the item that’s being returned.

Endorsed by MEMA Aftermarket Suppliers and the Auto Care Association, the campaign encourages parts professionals to follow a simple three-step process when processing warranty returns:

  1. Open the box.
  2. Inspect the part.
  3. Verify the return.

Recently, Dorman Products published a return guide for fluid reservoirs.

If a customer wants to return a fluid reservoir, Dorman recommends these four steps to determine if it’s a valid warranty claim:

  1. Verify that it’s the right part type. Some customers return unrelated products and heavy objects as a scam to get money back.
  2. If it’s the correct part type, verify the part marking. Dorman reservoirs have the part number molded into the part, so you can be sure it’s the right part in the box.
  3. Verify that the cap is present in the box. Each Dorman reservoir comes with a cap, and if the cap is missing, the reservoir might not be covered under warranty policy.
  4. Verify whether the part has been used. A mounted or used reservoir will have marks from mounting fasteners, residue from being filled and/or yellowing from heat. If it doesn’t appear to be used, it may be new and unmounted, and therefore can be sold again.
  5. When the customer describes the reason for returning the part, write it on the side of the box. This can greatly help in identifying and fixing these issues.

You can download a PDF of the return guide below:

You May Also Like

MAF and MAP Sensors

These small-but-mighty components play an outsized role in keeping fuel-injected engines running smoothly.

MAF and MAP Sensors

While it might not sound like it to the untrained ear, the orchestration of components to achieve the ideal combustion cycle is nothing short of a symphony.

For fuel-injected engines, two important instruments in this precise arrangement are the mass airflow (MAF) sensor and the manifold absolute-pressure (MAP) sensor.

Electronic Parking Brakes

Safety, convenience and holding power – what’s not to love?

Electronic Parking Brake
Driveshaft Dynamics

Don’t let the terminology trip you up.

Driveshaft
Serpentine Belts Have a Strong Supporting Cast

Tensioners, balancers and pulleys are working behind the scenes to maintain harmony under the hood.

Tensioners and Pulleys
Artificial Intelligence in the Automotive Aftermarket

The applications for AI are endless, but hurdles still remain.

AI Aftermarket

Other Posts

Interpreting Dashboard Warning Lights

Navigating the neon jungle isn’t as easy as it used to be.

Dashboard Diagnostics
Stopping Power: Brake Master Cylinders

The brake master cylinder is the hydraulic hero behind every safe stop.

Brake Master Cylinder
Selling for Snow Season

Some categories that might be slow and steady for most of the year tend to get hot when the weather turns cold.

Snow Season
Active vs. Passive Wheel-Speed Sensors

Both have the same job, but they differ in how they do it.